Serving Up Volleyball Drills

Sometimes, as a coach, the hardest volleyball drills to come up with are for serving. Serving takes strength, as well as precision, as well as being prepared for what may happen on the return. A good serve, however, can make all the difference in the world when your team is in a game. The serve often sets the pace of the whole volley and can cause your opponents to tremble in fear. Who wants to be on the receiving end of a well-placed serve that is designed to cause the hitter to completely mess up the return? These volleyball drills will help your team learn control, reaction, and precision when it comes to the serve.

When serving, it is important to have good precision. Good volleyball drills will help hone this precision so that it becomes an almost automatic thing. In this first drill, each player should be behind the serving line with two balls. They will serve so the ball lands within the court. The players can serve as quickly as they like, so long as they cause the ball to land in the proper area. For each ball that lands out of the court, the team earns a penalty of 10 points. If the team reaches a set score, they begin accumulating conditioning penalties. These conditioning penalties are up to you, and you can set the levels, but you want to make it unpleasant to miss. For example, if the team accumulates 20 to 40 points, they could do leg lifts, while if they get over 40 points, they start wracking up suicides. After a player serves their two balls, they should jog after their balls and then jog them back. This combines several volleyball drills into a single drill.

There are more precision volleyball drills that you can implement also. A really good precision drill involves a pair of people. The coach picks a spot on the receiving court. A player sits on that point. The server must then serve the ball directly to that player. This drill works on a point system also. For each ball that is served directly to the sitting player, the server gains 1 point. If the serve lands inside of the court, the server gains 1 point. Any serve that lands outside of the court earns the server a penalty of 4 points. Keep a running total of the score. Once a player has either 10 negative or positive points, their turn is over. If the server has earned a total of 10 negative points, they are subject to conditioning penalties. A score of positive 10 earns a reprieve. Incorporating conditioning penalties into your volleyball drills is a great way to motivate your team to do as well as they can.

All forms of hitting in the game of volleyball require at least a degree of ball control. No other types of hitting need as much precision as serving. Working on volleyball drills that stress the importance of aiming the ball when serving will help your players understand the dynamics of pinpoint accuracy. They help your players become familiar with the body motions required to achieve that accuracy. And in the end, that is the main thrust of volleyball drills in the first place: to make difficult moves and situations a set of automatic movements.

Condition Your Team With Volleyball Drills

For any team, no matter what the sport, practice is not fun. No matter what kind of fun you put in your volleyball drills, the fact of the matter is that they still involve a lot of practice, and are just plain hard work. Like any sport that requires conditioning, after the first few weeks of practices, you will find out who is really there to play. These first few weeks are generally considered the conditioning weeks. Volleyball drills and conditioning go hand in hand. It is hard for your team to understand exactly what the reason behind this conditioning is.

Volleyball is a very demanding sport. Because of this, your conditioning volleyball drills will push your players to the limits of their abilities, and beyond. One of the key components in the game is strength. A player must be strong enough to hit a blazing ball across the net. Their legs need to be strong enough to propel them into the air for that block that could mean the difference between winning and losing. However, pure strength isn’t quite enough. Your players will need to have a good dose of explosive strength. It is important to be able to go from a standing position to a powerful jump, with a blistering hit behind it. To this end, you should include some strength training into your volleyball drills, such as weight lifting, squats, or even working with a medicine ball.

Adding agility exercises into your volleyball drills will prove to be vital also. Agility is important in creating a winning team. Picture how boring the game of volleyball would be if there was no diving saves, or pinpoint serves. In every spike that is ever executed, agility and strength are important parts of the move. Even blocking, passing, and setting require some agility to be performed correctly. Adding such exercises as frog jumps or explosive push-ups into your volleyball drills will help your players’ agility become a stronger force with each practice.

The volleyball drills mentioned so far can be fairly tough. It is the hardest, yet most vital component of conditioning drills that will turn practice from a slight workout to a grueling thing of dread: endurance. It is great to be able to spike and serve beautifully in the first set of a game. Being able to perform the same move, with as much grace and power after playing for 45 minutes or more is what is going to make a winning team. Building the endurance of your team will make it so they can play just as well at the end of the game as they did at the beginning. Obviously, long distance running or extremely long practices could accomplish this, at least to a point. But this is where exercises like suicides and down-ups added into your volleyball drills will really pay off. These exercises are designed to cause a player to exert an amount of energy very quickly, followed by a short rest then repeating. This will help any player’s endurance become strong enough to last through an entire game.

Conditioning volleyball drills are, from a player’s point of view, the worst thing about any practice. They can be difficult to justify until an actual game is played. It is easy to see first hand what working on serving or setting will affect. These are visible gains that can be seen every time the ball is hit, either in practice or a real game. Conditioning isn’t visible, so progress can be hard to measure. That progress won’t be really shown until actual game time, at which time you and your team will see that of all the volleyball drills you worked on, conditioning can arguably be considered the most important skill to have worked on.