How to Measure and Release Fish Correctly

Many people approach measuring fish with a relaxed approach and risk hefty fines, particularly if the fish is borderline size. There is no grey area when it comes to legal size of catch. Even the difference of 1cm can have you in trouble, and is just not worth the risk of a fine.

Sustainability needs to be taken very seriously, hence Fisheries have very clear guidelines. Sustainable fishing means that fish are harvested at a sustainable rate, so the fish population does not decline over time due to poor fishing practices. Imagine a world that is over-harvested and the corresponding devastation to the eco-system and to our future generations. It is the responsibility of each and every one of us to do our bit to protect the planet.

Size limits are typically based on biological research into the reproductive cycle of each species. Minimum size limits generally allow fish to spawn at least once and contribute to the population before they are taken.

The biggest mistake when measuring the length of your catch is where people don’t use a flat surface to measure the fish on. Ensure that if you use a mat, that it is not crumpled causing you to potentially overestimate the size of the fish. Adhesive or stick-on devices, when exposed to the weather, can shrink and become unreliable. Using a solid measuring implement is the best way.

As fish tend to contract if placed on ice, err on the side of caution and allow an extra inch at the initial measure.

Close the jaw of the fish to ensure an accurate reading. The overall measurement of a fish, whether it is fork tailed or round tailed, is taken from the outside of the snout on the upper jaw, to the extreme tip of the tail.

Your State Fisheries website will likely have an outline on how to measure an array of sea life e.g. crabs and squid as well as fish, so it might be worthwhile printing out a copy and keeping it in your tackle box for reference.

To assist in survival of your catch, avoid holding the belly area as you will almost certainly damage internal organs, which reduces chances of survival dramatically.

Never touch the fish’s gills as they are easily damaged.

Use a pair of long-nosed pliers, or a purpose made hook-release to quickly and efficiently remove the hook. If the fish has hooked deeply, cut the line as close to the hook as possible and leave the hook in the fish as it will probably do more damage trying to remove a deep hook than to leave it where it is.

Serving Up Volleyball Drills

Sometimes, as a coach, the hardest volleyball drills to come up with are for serving. Serving takes strength, as well as precision, as well as being prepared for what may happen on the return. A good serve, however, can make all the difference in the world when your team is in a game. The serve often sets the pace of the whole volley and can cause your opponents to tremble in fear. Who wants to be on the receiving end of a well-placed serve that is designed to cause the hitter to completely mess up the return? These volleyball drills will help your team learn control, reaction, and precision when it comes to the serve.

When serving, it is important to have good precision. Good volleyball drills will help hone this precision so that it becomes an almost automatic thing. In this first drill, each player should be behind the serving line with two balls. They will serve so the ball lands within the court. The players can serve as quickly as they like, so long as they cause the ball to land in the proper area. For each ball that lands out of the court, the team earns a penalty of 10 points. If the team reaches a set score, they begin accumulating conditioning penalties. These conditioning penalties are up to you, and you can set the levels, but you want to make it unpleasant to miss. For example, if the team accumulates 20 to 40 points, they could do leg lifts, while if they get over 40 points, they start wracking up suicides. After a player serves their two balls, they should jog after their balls and then jog them back. This combines several volleyball drills into a single drill.

There are more precision volleyball drills that you can implement also. A really good precision drill involves a pair of people. The coach picks a spot on the receiving court. A player sits on that point. The server must then serve the ball directly to that player. This drill works on a point system also. For each ball that is served directly to the sitting player, the server gains 1 point. If the serve lands inside of the court, the server gains 1 point. Any serve that lands outside of the court earns the server a penalty of 4 points. Keep a running total of the score. Once a player has either 10 negative or positive points, their turn is over. If the server has earned a total of 10 negative points, they are subject to conditioning penalties. A score of positive 10 earns a reprieve. Incorporating conditioning penalties into your volleyball drills is a great way to motivate your team to do as well as they can.

All forms of hitting in the game of volleyball require at least a degree of ball control. No other types of hitting need as much precision as serving. Working on volleyball drills that stress the importance of aiming the ball when serving will help your players understand the dynamics of pinpoint accuracy. They help your players become familiar with the body motions required to achieve that accuracy. And in the end, that is the main thrust of volleyball drills in the first place: to make difficult moves and situations a set of automatic movements.

How to Find the Sweet Spot to Fish In

How to Find large Fish!

Everyone wonders when on the lake, where should I look for that monster fish? Why am I not finding the fish worth catching? These are just the basic questions a person might have about fishing that have and will always have a common answer. Going beyond the common answer to “How to Find Large Fish”.

How to Find large fish based on location!

Location plays a major role from what lake to fish to area of that lake to scour looking for the record setter. Looking for the largest fish in a lake is or may seem complex it really is quite simple mostly common sense. look at the lake the surrounds of this lake, has the habitat been well nourished by nature or has nature written it off? Theses questions will help to identify if the fish have been well taken care of or neglected by nature. A fertile lake will yield better fishing results than that of a sickly lake.

Identifying Areas to fish on the lake!

When you launch your boat or pick a place from shore to fish look for the wind direction if any, and structure piles such as fallen trees and rock piles fallen piers and boat docks. These are great areas to fish alone and most of the time will have great results.Observe the water do you see bait-fish? or any other fish in the area this can tell you if the fish are staying in one area or are on the move and if you will have to anchor or drift to learn how to find large fish.

Bait!

A lot of time people will try to fish with these little baits to try and catch monster fish, when learning how to find large fish you have to understand that large fish are hungry for large food, also it take a lot of energy for a giant fish to move and any movement will need to be worth it to them at the same time that is why they are so difficult to catch. So to sum it up be sure to use worth while bait for that monster.

Electronics!

In today’s world there are a lot of gadgets out there to show you how to find large fish some of these work some do not careful what you buy they have a product to sell and the claims made may not be 100% accurate. Stick close to name brand items these will have the best results and help you to land more fish.

Panama Fishing – Coiba Island & Hannibal Banks

Coiba Island

Located off the Pacific Coast of Panama, Coiba Island is part of the province of Veraguas and the district of Montijo. At 503 square kilometers (194 square miles), Coiba Island is the largest island in all of Central America.

Coiba was originally home to the Cacique Indian tribe until Spanish settlement and conquest circa 1560. The island remained largely uninhabited until 1919, when authorities built a penal colony on the island. The colony was known and feared for its brutality and was finally closed in 2004. The entire island was declared a national park in 1992. In 2005, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) declared Coiba Island a world heritage site.

Coiba’s isolation and lack of development has led to the evolution of distinct species of flora and fauna. Subspecies unique to the island include the Coiba Island howler monkey, the Coiba agouti and the Coiba spinetail. It is also a haven for the scarlet macaw, a bird species endangered in the rest of Panama.

Coiba also has a unique ocean topography that has led to population by rare species of fish and underwater mammals. Coiba is linked to the Galápagos Islands by the underwater Coco Ridge mountain chain. This protects the island and the surrounding waters from the effects of El Nino. As a result, the waters host several species yet to be discovered or classified by humankind. To date, scientists have found more than 760 different species of fish, including Snapper, Amberjack, Barracuda and three types of Marlin.

Fishing Coiba Island an angler’s dream. The waters host abundant schools of some of the most exotic game fish in the world. If you decide to fish in Coiba while in Panama, there’s a good chance you will catch something that you have never seen before. Roosterfish, Cubera snapper, Wahoo, Snook and Pacific Tarpon are some of the species that you can catch when you fish Coiba. You also can find plenty of the staples of sport fishing like Black Marlin and Yellowfin Tuna. Fishing Coiba is a Panama experience that you won’t forget.

Hannibal Banks

Hannibal Banks is a sea-mount located approximately 20 miles west of Coiba Island. It was named after the USS Hannibal, a converted steamship purchased by the United States Navy. The ship’s crew discovered the banks in 1914 while doing survey work for the Panama Canal.

The Hannibal Banks rise sharply from the ocean floor from several thousand feet to just over a hundred feet deep. This creates a strong “up-welling” of the ocean currents which results in cooler, deeper and more nutrient-rich water replacing the surface water. The constant replenishment of the water with nutrients attracts smaller baitfish. The baitfish, in turn, attract large numbers of sport trophy fish.

The abundance of these big game fish makes the Hannibal Banks one of the most popular sport fishing destinations in the Western Hemisphere. Commercial fishing is strictly prohibited, and the Panamanian military takes aggressive enforcement against violators. Most of the Panama sport fishing charters cooperate with the government by reporting any illegal activity. As a result, the Hannibal Banks maintains its abundant supply of sport fish despite the fact that fishing in Hannibal Banks has become more popular over the past twenty years.

If you are looking for big game such as Marlin, Sailfish or Yellowfin Tuna, the Hannibal Banks is a mecca for these fish. The months of December through April are when these fish are at their peak, but the Hannibal Banks is sufficiently populated that you can still get a great catch during the off season. “Fishing season” is a relative term here, with abundant supply year round.