How to Choose the Best Spinning Reel on the Market

Spinning reels are a helpful tool that every avid fisher should have in their arsenal. These are so popular among fishers of all skill levels because they are very lightweight, intuitive, and easy to use. However, not all spinning reels are created equal. Since this type of reel is such a crucial part of the fishing process, it’s important to find the best spinning reel on the market. Here are some tips and tricks to help you find the best one for your needs.

Material and Construction

The construction of spinning reel is very important to your fishing success. It’s important to choose a reel that is durably constructed so you’ll be able to get years of use out of it. To test the construction of the reel, look at how the parts are assembled. Everything should feel solid, with no flimsy parts, and the materials should feel heavy duty. When the reel is in motion, the action should feel smooth and comfortable.

It’s also important to consider the material your reel is made of. Generally, spinning reels are made from either graphite or aluminum. There are pros and cons to both materials. Aluminum reels are very strong, but they can also be very heavy, which can be a challenge for some fishers. However, their construction tends to be more solid. Graphite reels are lighter and easier to handle, which make them a good choice for beginner fishers. They’re also essential for anyone who fishes in saltwater, because graphite does not corrode in the same way other materials do.

Speed and Gear Ratio

The speed at which your wheel rotates will affect the level of control you have over the reel. To determine what speed you need for your reel, you’ll need to look at the gear ratio of your reel. The gear ratio indicates how many times the reel rotates with the rotation of the handle. A higher gear rotation means the gear will rotate faster. For new fishers, a slow to mid-range gear rotation is going to be the most effective for control.

Size

Since spinning reels can be very heavy, the overall size is very important to consider. The weight should also be directly correlated with the weight of the line you intend to use. For bigger fish, you will need to use a heavier line. If you are using a heavier line, it’s important that your reel can handle the extra weight. However, it’s also important to consider how the reel handles overall. If you don’t have much upper body strength, it’s best to start with a light reel and work your way up to heavier fishing.

Spool Quality

Another factor that is very important to consider is the overall quality of the spool on the spinning reel. The way the spool is constructed will affect the smoothness and overall handling while you’re casting. There are two types of spools – internal and skirted. Skirted spools are generally the preferred style of spool in modern fishing because they help prevent tangling of the line. For those who prefer a longer casting distance, it may also be helpful to look for a long cast spool that will reach much further. The cast and feel of the spool is something that’s important to test before making a purchase.

Pricing

Fishing materials can be very expensive, so it’s important to find a reel that will give you the best value for money. You may have to spend more to get the quality you need, but it’s important to make sure the price directly corresponds to the value of the reel. A good reel is an investment piece, so don’t hesitate to take your time shopping around to find the best spinning reel on the market.

There are many factors to consider when shopping for a spinning reel. The overall construction and handling of the product is essential to the way the reel handles. When in doubt, try to go to a local fishing shop and test the reels in person with the help of an expert. This will help you find the reel that is the best fit for you.

Fishing Is Much Crueler Than Hunting

It is now spring and time to go fishing. I always wonder where all the protesters are. Every year in the fall we have people protesting the cruelty of hunting. Some will write letters to the editor of their local paper while others will actually harass, and even physically accost, a person holding a gun. These protesters are lucky that most hunters show a great level of restraint. But why do people protest hunting and not fishing? Fishing is much crueler than hunting.

Consider the typical deer hunter. What if they used bait instead of a gun – just like a fisherman. They would take a hook with a rope attached and put it inside an apple. The hunter would then place the apple on the ground and wait for some unsuspecting deer to come along. As soon as the deer chomps onto the apple the hunter would jerk hard on the rope and set the hook. The deer would then be dragged, kicking and fighting, back to the hunter. Now the hunter has the same three scenarios available to every fisherman:

Scenario #1 – Catch and Release.

This is the choice of most “conservationists”. The hunter removes the hook as carefully as possible. They then take a ‘selfie’ with the deer to show everybody what a successful hunter they are. Then the deer is released so that it can be caught, dragged and then released again.

Scenario #2 – The Stringer.

The deer has a large metal apparatus threaded through its mouth. It is then tied to a tree so that it can be kept alive, kicking and fighting, while other deer might be caught. Once the hunting is done then this deer will be placed alive into a cooler for the ride home so that it can slowly suffocate.

Scenario #3 – Death.

The hunter hits the deer on the head and kills it immediately. The deer is then dressed and prepared for processing. The deer feels no pain and does not fear for its’ life.

Most hunters prefer scenario #3. Good hunters try to kill their target with one clean shot. Hunters do not look for animals that will “put up a good fight” like fishermen do. But for most fishermen “catch and release” is considered to be the sign of a “true conservationist”.

And, fishermen do not use apples. They often use live bait. Imagine a hunter taking a live animal, like a rabbit, and putting a hook through its back and then tossing it out as bait. Most people would be appalled. But this is exactly what fisherman do on a daily basis.

And then there is snagging. The hunter puts a large grappling hook on a rope and then tosses it into the woods. He then pulls the rope in hoping that the hook will jab into the side of some unsuspecting animal. Sounds pretty cruel but fisherman do it all the time.

So why do people protest hunting but not fishing? Is it because we believe a mammal to be more important than a fish? Maybe we believe this because we ourselves are mammals. I think that if fish were granted the same rights as mammals there would be protesters at boat landings rather than in the woods.

Finding Your Snowboarding Stance

How to properly find your stance

Opening day, cold temps, and a parking lot. You’re setting up your new board in the parking lot and realize that if you keep doing this you won’t feel your hands after awhile…

Don’t be that guy. Be ready when opening day comes. Set up your in a heated shelter. All you need is a screwdriver and a little bit of knowledge. A tape measure can also help too.

TIP 1: Angles

This is the direction your toes will point when strapped into the board. First, lay your board on an even surface, then stand on top of it. See what feels comfortable, having your angles the opposite or the same. The basic stance angles are between -18 to 18 degrees. If you’re planning on riding switch, make sure you have a little “Duck” to your stance. This means that your back foot is the opposite angle of your front foot. So say your front foot is a 15, your back foot would then be a negative 15. If your goal is to do some harsh carves, put both bindings at a positive angle. Try a variety of stances to see what you’re most comfortable with.

TIP 2: Width

The width of the stance is the distance between the center of each binding. To measure what your stance width would be, measure from heel to knee cap. This is what the normal distance is for most people. Make sure of one thing, that it is not uncomfortably wide or narrow. The typical stance width is a tad wider than your shoulders. The most important thing is to not feel awkward while strapped into your board.

TIP 3: Throwing it all together

For this step you are going to need a #3 Phillips head screwdriver. First, place the bindings on the board where you found what was most comfortable. Now you are going to want to place the center plates or as we like to call them cookies in the bindings. Make sure that the holes in the cookies match up with the screw holes on the board. Place the bolts in the correct spot, use the #3 Philips head screwdriver to tighten the bolts. An easy way to test the stance is to make the bolts loose and stand in the bindings. This way it will be easier to re-adjust them if it doesn’t feel right.

Once you have the bindings on and tightened, it’s time to strap in. When you strap in, make sure the binding strap is centered around the boot. If it is not centered you might have uneven pressure points, which suck by the way. If the straps aren’t centered, there should be something on the strap that lets you tighten and or loosen it.

TIP 4: Finishing touches

Before hitting the slopes you are going to want to dull or sharpen your edges. If you hit rails you are going to want to dull the edges just enough so it reduces the chances of you catching an edge. To dull or sharpen them you are going to need a file. Watch this short video on how to dull your edges. After you finished the technical part, it’s time to make your board look good. As everyone calls it, a “sticker job”, is an inexpensive way to make your board look slick. Die cut stickers or regular stickers can turn any board into a masterpiece. You just have to find stickers that you like!

Ways to Tell You Are Serving Correctly in Volleyball

Consistent, accurate serving is the objective of every volleyball player – from youth to Olympic team member. To reach that point, however, it’s important to know if you are serving correctly. Here are some ways to do that.

The first way to tell whether you are serving correctly is whether the ball is going where you want it to go. I know that sounds very simplistic, but the reality of things is that proper mechanics tends to result in high levels of accuracy. If you are consistently hitting your target then chances are pretty good you’ve got things right. That said, chances are you’re reading this article because you aren’t as accurate or powerful a server as you’d like, so let me provide you with some checkpoints you can use to get yourself on track.

Are you finishing your serve balanced? If not, there’s something wrong. Usually, it comes down to your toss. If you toss the ball too far to the left or right you’ll end up leaning in that direction to try to make proper ball contact. Either that or you’ll be serving the ball in that direction when you didn’t intend to do so. If you find your weight well onto your front toes, then you’ve tossed the ball too far forward, while having to arch your back and lean backwards means a toss behind your ideal contact point. All of this can be fixed by improving your toss.

Is the ball spinning when you want it to float, or floating when you want it to spin? That is a function of your ball contact. You need to make sure you’re stricking the right part of the ball in the correct way to get the desired effect.

Is the ball coming landing short or going too far? Distance in serving is all about the speed of your hand at contact. Swing your arm faster to hit the ball farther (notice I didn’t say swing harder). Swing your arm slower to hit the ball shorter. Make sure to keep your ball contact firm, though. No floppy wrist or mushy hand!

Does your shoulder hurt when you serve? If so, it probably means your arm swing is off in some fashion – assuming you don’t simply have an injury from something else, of course. This again could be related to ball toss, but it could also be a function of your mechanics. This might be hard to judge by yourself, though. You’ll likely want the help of a coach in evaluating your arm swing – or at least the use of video.

Which brings up perhaps the best way to gauge whether you are serving properly. Video yourself serving and compare it to video of someone who serves properly. There are many tools out there these days that allow for side-by-side analysis. This will let you see how your technique stacks up against the good server in the areas of body posture, arm preparation, toss, footwork, and follow-through.

Hopefully you have a coach who is keeping an eye on your serving technique and helping you correct things as needed. If not, though, the tips here should help you identify problems and put you on a path toward more effective serving.

How to Measure and Release Fish Correctly

Many people approach measuring fish with a relaxed approach and risk hefty fines, particularly if the fish is borderline size. There is no grey area when it comes to legal size of catch. Even the difference of 1cm can have you in trouble, and is just not worth the risk of a fine.

Sustainability needs to be taken very seriously, hence Fisheries have very clear guidelines. Sustainable fishing means that fish are harvested at a sustainable rate, so the fish population does not decline over time due to poor fishing practices. Imagine a world that is over-harvested and the corresponding devastation to the eco-system and to our future generations. It is the responsibility of each and every one of us to do our bit to protect the planet.

Size limits are typically based on biological research into the reproductive cycle of each species. Minimum size limits generally allow fish to spawn at least once and contribute to the population before they are taken.

The biggest mistake when measuring the length of your catch is where people don’t use a flat surface to measure the fish on. Ensure that if you use a mat, that it is not crumpled causing you to potentially overestimate the size of the fish. Adhesive or stick-on devices, when exposed to the weather, can shrink and become unreliable. Using a solid measuring implement is the best way.

As fish tend to contract if placed on ice, err on the side of caution and allow an extra inch at the initial measure.

Close the jaw of the fish to ensure an accurate reading. The overall measurement of a fish, whether it is fork tailed or round tailed, is taken from the outside of the snout on the upper jaw, to the extreme tip of the tail.

Your State Fisheries website will likely have an outline on how to measure an array of sea life e.g. crabs and squid as well as fish, so it might be worthwhile printing out a copy and keeping it in your tackle box for reference.

To assist in survival of your catch, avoid holding the belly area as you will almost certainly damage internal organs, which reduces chances of survival dramatically.

Never touch the fish’s gills as they are easily damaged.

Use a pair of long-nosed pliers, or a purpose made hook-release to quickly and efficiently remove the hook. If the fish has hooked deeply, cut the line as close to the hook as possible and leave the hook in the fish as it will probably do more damage trying to remove a deep hook than to leave it where it is.