6 Wonderful Reasons to Take Up Fishing As a Hobby

Those who live close to the sea or any water body have a great opportunity to venture out for grabbing a catch. Fishing is also a profession where fishermen go out to the seas to grab catches for commercial benefits. For those who take it as a hobby, it is a great chance for them to get away from the busy lives and take a break. There are varied reasons for people to take up it as a hobby.

• Stress Reliever – A water body isn’t anywhere close to places where people reside and thus moving away from the hustle and bustle of the busy lives is something that relieves one from the daily stress that they endure. A calm and quiet place is enticing to bring a change from the busy lives that people lead.

• Better relationships – People may think of venturing out to grab a catch with their family, friends and acquaintances. This leads to stronger bonds when they spend some time with them and interacting while outdoors.

• Healthy – The only movement of the body that one makes in the entire day is to move about in the grocery store and the rest of the time is spent sitting for hours at work or driving about in the city. This adds up to health worries and thus fishing every once in a while would help people to move around and grab some activity. This would create good effects on one’s health and helping people to have control over their weight and other health ailments.

• Fun activity – Even if one cannot grab a catch, it is fun to put down the bait and watch fishes being lured but not getting trapped. Having fun competitions amongst each other in the group makes it recreational and simply letting oneself to let loose and create an entertaining environment.

• Adding a feather to their hat – There are several people who intend to gain accomplishments in varied activities that they take part in their lifetime. While a person learns the art, it is an accomplishment where one can add another feather to their cap of achievements in life. It can aid to boasting about amongst friends and acquaintances.

• Fish being good for the health – It is proven that wild fishes are low in cholesterol and fat and is rich in protein and nutrition. It is nutritious for people of all ages and having something prepared out of their catch has a fun element in itself.

4 Simple Fishing Tips for Beginners

The first tip in simple fishing is making sure the rig is just right. There are two reasons making sure the rig is just right. First, a strong well tied fishing knot won’t break when setting the hook and second, certain knots swim your fly or lure in a way similar to the way fish swim making it more natural. There are many different ways of tying a knot and that all depends on what you are fishing for. Here are a few knots and what they are used for. The first one is a Turle Knot which is a great fixed knot for fly fishing and a Uni Knot is a loop left open that makes streamers and nymphs look realistic.

Second tip is making sure your lure is swimming properly. You need to make sure that your bait is naturally moving through the water and mimicking fish movements and you do that with your rod tip and reel speed. When you pull on your rod tip and reel down to gather slack but making sure to keep in contact with your lure. Some people think they are going to catch something if they just cast and reel as fast as they can but if you do that your lure will not look like a natural fish in the water. Just make sure to swim your lure as the fishing spot dictates and you will have a better chance of catching that monster fish or just catching something period.

Third tip is changing depths. Some people that fish the top of the water thinks it is fun but if there are no fish at the surface it won’t be as fun as you won’t be catching anything. If you are going to be fishing the top of the water, you want to make sure you are using a jig, spoon or a metal-lipped jerk bait to better your chances of catching something. You might have to go deeper to find where the fish are. There are going to be times where you will need to add or subtract weight when bait fishing or go to a sink tip or sinking line when you are fly fishing. Just remember if you are having any top water action you might need to go deeper to find where the fish are.

Final tip is changing location. If you have been sitting in the same spot for a while and have changed different lures and baits and there is nothing baiting, you need to move around to where the fish are at. But before you decide to leave the location you are at make sure you have covered all the water around you. Make sure to throw a couple of cast to your left, to your right, in front of the boat and in the back of the boat. You never know the fish could be anywhere and it is easy to move the boat to where the fish are.

With these few tips you will be able to catch that monster fish or a pile of pan fish this summer and possible into the winter, that’s if you think you have the summer fishing down to give ice fishing a try. Good luck fishing this summer.

Beach Fishing: Your Fun As Beginners

To help you have a great beach fishing experience, we are going to explain how you should read a beach, what kind of fishing tackle to use and some basic fishing techniques to follow!

Find your beach spot

Beach fishing does require an ability to read water action, colour and current. It’s always a good idea to pick a high vantage point to help you assess the beach before you start.

You can often see the movement of the currents and particularly look out for dark areas which may indicate a gutter or hole that could be the perfect spot to cast your line into.

The right weather conditions

It’s always more enjoyable to try beach fishing on a bright, clear day. Foggy or windy conditions may mean you come across obstacles, so it’s probably best to avoid this type of weather, particularly if you’re just starting out.

Choosing your tackle

When it comes to a novice angler, a light rod with soft tip is always good when targeting small fish. This allows excellent action, enabling the bait to smoothly swim and act.

For example, a light, 10ft long beach rod on a spin outfit with leader around 3ft or 4ft would be a good choice. Using a running sinker rig means it will move around more freely and cover more area but keep your bait at the bottom, which is what you want.

Baiting up

The bait you use is very important and while it will depend on the fish you are targeting, fresh beach worms are often a good choice, particularly if you are hoping to hook a whiting, trevally or bream.

You’ll also need to think about the hook you use for your bait. Using a long shank hook will make it easier to thread the worms on. Try threading the worm on the hook by going in and out of the worm so it sits along the shank but ensure the hook end is exposed. You want to make sure you get a good hold on your fish when it bites!

Time to get fishing

After picking the spot where you’re going to fish and getting your tackle ready, it’s time to get started. You don’t need to necessarily cast a long way out, again have a look at the water and try and target the holes and gutters where the fish may be feeding.

When you are on a fish, try to avoid walking backwards as most beaches slope up and you risk falling over and may lose your fish and tension on the line. You might also notice a strong resistance with the wave movement. Once your fish is hooked, do not pull it too hard. Let the waves wash the fish in for you. Wait, hold it and let the waves do their job.

Important tips

The waves will often push your rig towards the beach as they roll in and may mean that you lose contact periodically, just work with the waves and don’t try to grip your rod. This shouldn’t affect you being able to feel the fish once you hook one. It is also advisable to wear a pair of polarised sunglasses. You can see different colours in water, shallow bank or deeper green edge. You can also see how the waves are breaking, and on a clear day you may even see the fish in the water. It’s pretty cool.

Panama Fishing – Coiba Island & Hannibal Banks

Coiba Island

Located off the Pacific Coast of Panama, Coiba Island is part of the province of Veraguas and the district of Montijo. At 503 square kilometers (194 square miles), Coiba Island is the largest island in all of Central America.

Coiba was originally home to the Cacique Indian tribe until Spanish settlement and conquest circa 1560. The island remained largely uninhabited until 1919, when authorities built a penal colony on the island. The colony was known and feared for its brutality and was finally closed in 2004. The entire island was declared a national park in 1992. In 2005, the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) declared Coiba Island a world heritage site.

Coiba’s isolation and lack of development has led to the evolution of distinct species of flora and fauna. Subspecies unique to the island include the Coiba Island howler monkey, the Coiba agouti and the Coiba spinetail. It is also a haven for the scarlet macaw, a bird species endangered in the rest of Panama.

Coiba also has a unique ocean topography that has led to population by rare species of fish and underwater mammals. Coiba is linked to the Galápagos Islands by the underwater Coco Ridge mountain chain. This protects the island and the surrounding waters from the effects of El Nino. As a result, the waters host several species yet to be discovered or classified by humankind. To date, scientists have found more than 760 different species of fish, including Snapper, Amberjack, Barracuda and three types of Marlin.

Fishing Coiba Island an angler’s dream. The waters host abundant schools of some of the most exotic game fish in the world. If you decide to fish in Coiba while in Panama, there’s a good chance you will catch something that you have never seen before. Roosterfish, Cubera snapper, Wahoo, Snook and Pacific Tarpon are some of the species that you can catch when you fish Coiba. You also can find plenty of the staples of sport fishing like Black Marlin and Yellowfin Tuna. Fishing Coiba is a Panama experience that you won’t forget.

Hannibal Banks

Hannibal Banks is a sea-mount located approximately 20 miles west of Coiba Island. It was named after the USS Hannibal, a converted steamship purchased by the United States Navy. The ship’s crew discovered the banks in 1914 while doing survey work for the Panama Canal.

The Hannibal Banks rise sharply from the ocean floor from several thousand feet to just over a hundred feet deep. This creates a strong “up-welling” of the ocean currents which results in cooler, deeper and more nutrient-rich water replacing the surface water. The constant replenishment of the water with nutrients attracts smaller baitfish. The baitfish, in turn, attract large numbers of sport trophy fish.

The abundance of these big game fish makes the Hannibal Banks one of the most popular sport fishing destinations in the Western Hemisphere. Commercial fishing is strictly prohibited, and the Panamanian military takes aggressive enforcement against violators. Most of the Panama sport fishing charters cooperate with the government by reporting any illegal activity. As a result, the Hannibal Banks maintains its abundant supply of sport fish despite the fact that fishing in Hannibal Banks has become more popular over the past twenty years.

If you are looking for big game such as Marlin, Sailfish or Yellowfin Tuna, the Hannibal Banks is a mecca for these fish. The months of December through April are when these fish are at their peak, but the Hannibal Banks is sufficiently populated that you can still get a great catch during the off season. “Fishing season” is a relative term here, with abundant supply year round.

Want To Catch Big Bass? You Have To Fish For Them!

Yes, we all want to catch big bass and catch that once in a lifetime bass but most anglers just don’t fish for them. They fish where the average size bass are located but not the monster bass. Then the angler wonders why he doesn’t catch the fish he wants to catch.

A big bass isn’t going to be out in the open. for sure. Matter of fact, most anglers will never ever get near a monster when fishing. They are too worried about catching bass and just fish where the average size bass feeds and lives. Yes, they fish structure, weeds, stumps and etc. but that is not where the pigs are feeding. The anglers have read so much about bass fishing they think that is where to fish for big bass.
It’s NOT!

Confused? You’re not alone, so are hundreds of thousands other bass anglers. Do you really think the lunkers got big by being out in the open where other small bass are feeding? Yeah, you’ll catch a nice bass every so often but you’re not catching big bass on a regular basis. Big bass are going to be in deep cover, some bass have never seen a lure even because anglers don’t go where they are located.

Big bass are going to be located in the thickest, heaviest cover you can find or even imagine. They are going to stay close to that cover most of their lives. Some will never see a lure because anglers won’t go where they are or don’t know where they are in the lake they are fishing. You can fish a whole lake and never come close to a monster bass.

I know an angler and have fished with him that catches nice size bass regularly. Other anglers just can’t believe how he catches monster bass all the time. So, why does he catch the pigs while other anglers are catching nothing? Because he fishes for them! He fishes where they are, he goes in places where most anglers don’t even think of going and fishing. He fishes lures that resemble the prey the bass are eating. He imitates the prey with his retrieve and does everything he can to make that lure look real.

If the bass are eating craws, why throw a lure that is 10 inches long? How does that imitate what the bass are eating? If the bass are feeding on shad then why throw a craw? Listen, bass have lived where they are most of their lives, they know what is natural in their environment. If something is out of place then the bass is going to know that and be cautious about being around it. Bass didn’t get their size because they just fed on anything that came along. If their environment changes then they are not going to feed… period.

Another thing is big bass aren’t going to chase your lure like you think they will go after it. The guy who catches the big bass on a regular basis fishes his lure so slow that you think he fell asleep. It might take him 10 minutes to get his lure back to the boat. He wants to keep his lure in front of the big bass’ face for as long as he can keep it there. Why does he do that? To temp the bass into striking longer.

I fish the same way, I fish the heaviest, thickest cover I can find. I put my lure right where the cover is the thickest and then wait. After awhile I will move the lure and move it slow. I learned this a long time ago and noticed when I fish like this I catch more nice bass and you will too. I fish from shore a lot and have had dozen of boating anglers come over and ask what I was using as a lure. I would tell them and even show them my lure. What they didn’t realize was it didn’t matter if I showed them the lure or not if they didn’t have the technique to go along with it. Next time you’re out on your favorite lake, look around, look under trees, look for the thickest cover in the lake and try fishing it. Fish where others don’t fish or even think about going to find cover. Try it! You’ll be surprised!